1 Corinthians 1-2

After a brief salutation and expression of gratitude, Paul gets down to business. He had received a report from a family in Corinth about the existence of contentious divisions in the church. In the first two chapters the apostle not only addresses the sinfulness of their factions, he also addresses an underlying cause, namely, a misplaced elevation of human wisdom.

I. Chapter 1

A. Salutation (1:1-3)

B. Gratitude (1:4-9)

1. As is typically the case, Paul expresses gratitude for the recipients of his letter while offering insight into the contents of his prayers for them.

2. He is grateful for their reception of God’s grace, that they have been enriched in Christ, and that they lack no spiritual gift.

C. Division over preachers (1:10-17)

1. Here Paul begins addressing their problems, the first of which is division. Having heard from Chloe’s family of their divisions, Paul appeals to them to be united (10-11).

2. Though they were dividing based on personal loyalties to preachers involved in their conversions, Paul takes their focus to Christ, the gospel, and the cross (12-17).

D. God’s wisdom in Christ (1:18-25)

1. The cross is foolish to those who don’t understand it. But for those who do, it is God’s power to save (18).

2. God’s plan for the redemption of man – a plan with the cross at its center – may seem foolish to some, but it is actually the embodiment of God’s power and wisdom (19-25).

E. Jesus is the only ground for boasting (1:26-31)

1. Paul reminds them that they were not among the wise, powerful, or upper classes. Yet God called them in the body of Christ (26-28).

2. There is nothing in the gospel message, properly understood, that would lead one to boast in himself. Our only basis for boasting is in what Jesus has done for us (29-31).

II. Chapter 2

A. The pre-eminence of Christ in Paul’s preaching (2:1-5)

1. Paul didn’t utilize lofty speech or human wisdom when he preached to them. He just preached Christ crucified. Truth be told, he was actually scared to death (1-3).

2. But he preached “in demonstration of the Spirit and power,” so that they would not elevate him (Paul), but magnify God (4-5).

B. The wisdom of God revealed (2:6-16)

1. The message of Paul’s preaching was the revelation of the “mystery,” that is, God’s eternal purpose for the redemption of man. This message was revealed to Paul and the other apostles by the Holy Spirit (6-13).

2. The person who is governed solely by worldly standards will not accept the spiritual nature of the gospel message (14-16).

III. Application Lessons

A. God’s grace is amazing (1:4-5). We should be grateful for it (4). It is God’s gift (4). It is in Christ (4). It makes us rich (5). It is responsible for what we accomplish in the kingdom (5).

B. We should have confidence in each other (1:8-9). Though they had many problems, Paul was confident that they would fix them and not forfeit their eternal salvation.

C. Unity in Christ is possible (1:10), but only if everyone is willing to agree to follow the standard of God’s word.

D. We don’t often think like God does (1:26-28; 1 Samuel 16:7; Luke 16:15; Psalm 50:21).

E. Be careful whom you glorify (1:29-31). No human being, especially preachers, should be given credit for what God is responsible for.

F. The message is more important and powerful than the messenger (2:1-4). God used a weak, frightened man to reach the Corinthians. The power was in the message.

G. The word of God is verbally inspired (2:9-13). The words that inspired men spoke were words that came from the Holy Spirit who revealed the mind of God.

Eddie Parrish

The Abiding Consequences of Sin

There are at least two results of sinful choices: guilt and consequences. By guilt, I mean that which God places onto your spiritual account and for which the impenitent will be eternally lost. By consequences, I refer to the negative circumstances of life that are brought about by the sin. Let us consider these two components.

Guilt

When a man commits sin, he transgresses God’s law (1 John 3:4) and incurs a debt to God that he is incapable of repaying (Matt. 18:21-35). But because Jesus poured out his lifeblood in suffering the penalty for sin (Heb. 2:9; Matt. 26:28), God can remove that debt (Rom. 3:24; 5:9). It matters not what the sin is; God is “faithful and righteous to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness” (1 John 1:9).

Saul of Tarsus is an excellent example of this. Regarding his pre-Christian life he wrote, “I used to persecute the church of God beyond measure and tried to destroy it” (Gal. 1:13). He was “a blasphemer and a persecutor and a violent aggressor” (1 Tim. 1:13). Still, he was “shown mercy” and overflowing grace (v. 13-14).

Praise God for the salvation that is in Christ!

Consequences

While submitting to the will of God can forever remove the guilt of sin, the temporal consequences may remain long after God has forgiven. Consider the bittersweet case of Moses. While leading God’s people through the Sinai wilderness in search of water, God instructed Moses to speak to a particular rock and water would miraculously come from it (Num. 20:8). In a moment of anger, Moses dishonored God in the presence of the people by striking the rock instead of speaking to it (v. 10-11). As a consequence of his sin, God barred him from entering the Promised Land (v. 12; Deut. 34:1-6).

We know that Moses had the guilt of that sin removed, for centuries later he appeared in his glorified state with Jesus and Elijah on the Mount of Transfiguration (Matt. 17:1-3). Notice, however, that even though God removed the guilt of his sin, he did not remove the temporal consequences. Moses died forgiven, but outside of Canaan.

One may commit a crime against society, subsequently seek and obtain God’s forgiveness, but still face a lifetime of consequences. The penitent and forgiven drug abuser of the past may still endure health and family problems the rest of his life. Divorcing one’s mate for a reason other than fornication can be forgiven, but a subsequent remarriage is still forbidden (Matt. 19:3-9).

The Wisdom of Forethought

Wisdom demands that we look before we leap. We should consider the consequences of our actions before we follow through with them, because when we choose an action we choose the consequences of that action. Scripture puts it this way: “Watch the path of your feet” (Prov. 4:26). “The prudent sees the evil and hides himself, but the naïve go on, and are punished for it” (Prov. 22:3).

It is a beautiful thing to have the promise of God’s grace to remove the guilt of our sins and set us on the road to eternal glory (Titus 2:11). But God has never promised to remove the temporal consequences of those sins.

Benefits of Daily Bible Reading

There are at least two things necessary for someone to begin an exercise program: (1) conviction regarding the advantages of the program; (2) the desire for those benefits. If either is missing, there will be no change in behavior. One may long to lose weight and increase heart health, but if he doesn’t believe the program will work, he won’t do it. Likewise, one may think that a program is effective, but if he doesn’t want to lose weight and be healthier, he won’t start the program.

As shepherds who watch the welfare of souls (Heb. 13:17), most elderships challenge the members in their charge to participate in a spiritual exercise program that includes daily Bible reading. With the hope of motivating us to engage in this helpful spiritual exercise, let us consider some of the benefits of it.

Daily Bible reading offers wisdom, direction, and guidance for life. Because “it is not in man who walks to direct his steps” (Jer. 10:23), we must “trust in the Lord” so that “he will direct [our] paths” (Prov. 3:5-6). For us to know where God wants us to go, we must listen to him as he speaks through the words of scripture.

“I have stored up your word in my heart, that I might not sin against you” (Psa. 119:11).

“Your testimonies are my delight; they are my counselors” (Psa. 119:24).

“Your commandment makes me wiser than my enemies, for it is ever with me. I have more understanding than all my teachers, for your testimonies are my meditation” (Psa. 119:98-99).

“Through your precepts I get understanding; therefore I hate every false way. Your word is a lamp to my feet and a light to my path” (Psa. 119:104-105).

“The unfolding of your words gives light; it imparts understanding to the simple” (Psa. 119:130).

As we walk each day down the pathways of life, there are always people telling us which path is the right one. How do we filter out dangerous, destructive, evil advice? How do we recognize who is directing us wisely and who foolishly? By sifting what we hear through the word of God. But each day that passes without our reading it, the less equipped we are to choose the right path.

Daily Bible reading reveals weaknesses and challenges us to work on our character. Regular self-examination is more than wise. It is vital (2 Cor. 13:5). Each time we open the word of God and think about what we are reading, we will discover something about ourselves. Often that discovery involves a weakness, sin, or area of needed improvement. Paul identified this helpful characteristic of the Bible when he wrote, “All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness” (2 Tim. 3:16). Is there anyone who could not benefit from this kind of character formation each day?

Daily Bible reading can enhance our prayers and praise. If you find yourself struggling to know what to say to God, reading and meditating on the Scriptures can improve the content of your prayers. Through regular communion with God in his word, we will find more and more reasons to offer thanksgiving and praise.

“I will praise you with an upright heart, when I learn your righteous rules” (Psa. 119:7).

“Seven times a day I praise you for your righteous rules” (Psa. 119:164).

“My lips will pour forth praise, for you teach me your statutes” (Psa. 119:171).

Daily Bible reading gives you material to think about when you aren’t reading. Our minds are never idle. They always focus on something. The things we think about originate from things we have previously perceived through our senses. The more we read the word of God, the more thought material we will have stored in our memories.

“At midnight I rise to praise you, because of your righteous rules” (Psa. 119:62).

“My eyes are awake before the watches of the night, that I may meditate on your promise” (Psa. 119:148).

Daily Bible reading can increase our comfort in times of difficulty. Earth is not heaven. Therefore, we will not escape hardships in this life. But the word of God offers a kind of comfort and peace in these trying times that nothing else can.

“For whatever was written in former days was written for our instruction, that through endurance and through the encouragement of the Scriptures we might have hope” (Rom. 15:4).

“This is my comfort in my affliction, that your promise gives me life” (Psa. 119:50).

“When I think of your rules from of old, I take comfort, O Lord” (Psa. 119:52).

“Great peace have those who love your law; nothing can make them stumble” (Psa. 119:165).

Daily Bible reading can fill us with hope for the future. The more aware we become of the moral and spiritual degradation of our culture, the more prone to discouragement we may become. But the more we read and meditate on the word of God, the more confidence we have in our future as his children. Reading the word of God each day can lift our spirits.

“And take not the word of truth utterly out of my mouth, for my hope is in your rules” (Psa. 119:43).

“Remember your word to your servant, in which you have made me hope” (Psa. 119:49).

These are not the only benefits to a program of daily Bible reading. But they should be enough to motivate us to invest time each day in communing with God and allowing him to offer us instruction, guidance, help, encouragement, wisdom, rebuke, comfort, and peace.