Romans 3:21 – 4:25

Introduction: Having established that everyone – Jew and Gentile – stands in need of salvation due to personal sin, Paul now turns his attention to explaining the basis of the salvation offered in Christ. We are not justified by merit. God justifies us because we trust him to save us.

I. The Basis of Justification is Grace, Appropriated by Faith (3:21-31)

A. The “righteousness of God” (i.e., the justification that comes from God) is possible apart from works of law in general, and the works of the Law of Moses in particular (3:21).

B. The basis of justification is the same for all, the grace of God made possible by Jesus Christ, who is the propitiation for our sins (3:22-25a).

C. God’s amazing plan for the redemption of man allows God to be both “just and the justifier of the one who has faith in Jesus” (3:25b-26).

D. Because we are declared righteous apart from meritorious works, we have no basis to boast (3:27-28).

E. God has decreed that both Jew and Gentile can be saved in the same way–on the basis of trusting, not earning (3:29-30). But this principle does no damage to the law. Rather, it harmonizes with it (3:31).

II. Abraham: and Example of Justification by Grace Through Faith (4:1-25)

A. Paul will explain in this chapter that the greatest hero of the Jews, Abraham, found justification through his trust in God, not any meritorious system of law.

B. Had Abraham been justified by merit, he would have plenty of reasons to boast. But the Scriptures are clear that what was put on his account as “righteousness” was his faith (Gen. 15:6), not meritorious works (4:1-8).

1. Paul explains the difference between grace and merit. When one works for pay, his wages are not counted as a gift (4:4).

2. But the one who doesn’t attempt to earn justification, but trusts in the one who can justify the ungodly, “his faith is counted as righteousness” (4:5-6).

C. Pious Jews placed inordinate value on circumcision, to the point that it was viewed meritoriously–that is, they believed that circumcision, in and of itself, obtained God’s approval (cf. Acts 15:1-5; Gal. 2:1-21; 5:6).

D. In 4:9-12, Paul reminds the Jewish Christians in Rome that Abraham was justified by faith long before he was ever circumcised.

1. The blessing of justification is not reserved for the circumcised only, and Abraham’s justification prior to circumcision proves that (4:9-10).

2. The fact that Abraham was counted as righteous because of his faith, and not because of his circumcision, is proof that he is the father of all who trust God for salvation, Jew or Gentile (4:11-12).

E. The promises that God made to Abraham regarding the blessings that would come through his descendants were made long before the Law of Moses ever came to be (4:13-15).

F. If the blessings promised through Abraham required perfect law-keeping, no one would enjoy them. That’s why those blessings are obtained through trusting God for them (4:16-17).

G. Abraham’s strong faith (4:18-21) was placed on his spiritual account as righteousness, not just for his sake alone, but for ours, too. If we follow in his steps, we will be justified in the same way he was (4:22-25).

III. Lessons

A. God blesses us, not because of who we are, but because of who he is (4:1-4; 1 John 4:19). God did not choose to bless Abraham because he owed Abraham.

B. There are four important terms used in this section that help us to understand our salvation:

1. Justification (3:24, 26, 28, 30) – a judicial term that denotes vindication, or receiving a favorable verdict. When we are justified, God drops the charges.

2. Redemption (3:24) – a financial term that denotes a payment of ransom. When we are redeemed, God pays for our release from captivity.

3. Propitiation (3:25) – a sacrificial term denoting the appeasement of righteous anger. Through the death of Jesus, the righteous demands of God’s nature are satisfied.

4. Accounting (4:11, 23-24) – another financial term that refers to a mathematical calculation that would be placed in a ledger. When we trust God for salvation, he places “righteousness” on our spiritual ledger.

Conclusion: Few Bible doctrines offer as much hope and peace as the doctrine of salvation by grace through faith. We would all be hopelessly doomed to eternal torment if our salvation were contingent on our personal perfection.

20 Lessons from Galatians

  1. Salvation is God’s gift to us (1:4; 2:16, 20; 3:8, 13-14, 26-29; 4:4-5; 5:1; 6:8).
  2. Doctrinal purity is non-negotiable (1:6-9; 2:4-5; 4:16; 5:7-9).
  3. It matters what we believe (1:6-9; 3:1-5; 5:7-9).
  4. We cannot serve God and man at the same time (1:10; 5:11).
  5. The Scriptures are inspired of God (1:11-12).
  6. God is no respecter of persons (2:6; 3:28).
  7. Christian fellowship is wonderful (2:9; 4:13-14; 6:2, 10).
  8. We should not be hypocrites (2:11-14).
  9. Sometimes sin must be rebuked publicly (2:11-14).
  10. Justification is by faith, not meritorious works (2:16-21; 3:1-14, 21-23; 4:1-5; 4:22-31).
  11. The gospel of Christ produces freedom from the bondage of law (3:10-14, 23; 4:1-7, 22-31; 5:1).
  12. The Law of Moses fulfilled its purpose (3:19-29).
  13. All Christians, regardless of race, are descendants of Abraham (3:29; 6:16).
  14. It is possible to fall from grace (5:4).
  15. Freedom in Christ is not license to sin (5:13-15).
  16. We should walk by the Spirit (5:16-18, 22-23, 25; 6:8).
  17. We should avoid the works of the flesh (5:16-17, 19-21, 24).
  18. We should restore the erring (6:1).
  19. We reap what we sow (6:7-8).
  20. Rewards belong to those who endure (6:9).