Romans 8

Introduction: In the previous chapter, Paul described the civil war being waged within his own heart and mind. There was a part of him that wanted to do right, but he often found himself doing wrong. Though God’s laws are good, his own weaknesses caused him to break those laws. He called his resulting condition “wretched” (7:24). In chapter 8, Paul will counter that wretched condition by describing the glorious state of those who are in Christ. What are the blessings of being a Christian?

I. The Indwelling Holy Spirit (8:1-17, 26-27)

A. Paul begins with a straightforward affirmation of the spiritual status of the person who is in Christ. That person stands under no condemnation (1).

B. This uncondemned state is because of what “law of the Spirit of life” – the law revealed by the Holy Spirit – accomplished. It has set the Christian free from “the law of sin and death” (2).

C. The Law of Moses could not do that because of the weakness of man. But God made it possible for the “righteous requirement of the law” to be fulfilled in us through the death of Jesus (3-4).

D. Those who have been set free are those who will focus their hearts on the things of the Holy Spirit, not the things of the flesh (5-8, 12-14). This is because the Christian is no longer “in the flesh but in the Spirit” (9).

E. As a result of this new relationship with God’s Spirit, we have spiritual life (10), the promise of a future resurrection (11), and a family relationship with God (15-17).

F. While on the topic of the Spirit, look ahead to 8:26-27 and note what Paul says regarding a special kind of help that we receive from the Spirit.

1. “Helps” translates a compound word in Greek and paints a picture of two people taking the opposite ends of a burden and lifting it together.

2. This passage teaches that when we have trouble knowing what to pray for – when we are so overwhelmed that our inner groanings cannot be put into words – the Spirit takes what is in our hearts and communicates it to the Father.

4. He “helps” me lift that burden.

II. Hope (8:18-25)

A. The statement of verse 18 introduces the rest of this difficult section. Whatever the meaning of verses 19-25 is, it must harmonize with verse 18 – that “the sufferings of this present time” do not compare “with the glory” that is to come.

B. The difficulty of this section is in identifying “the creation.” Is it the material creation? Is it the physical body? Is it the Christian?

1. I do not believe that it is the Christian. While the Christian is a “new creation” (2 Cor. 5:17), that is not how Paul is using that term here. The Christian is mentioned in this section, but not until verse 23, and that by way of contrast with the “creation.”

2. I believe that Paul is personifying the material, physical world – the earth and everything in it (except the people). Mankind was not the only thing adversely affected by the entrance of sin. The entire physical world was. It, too, is awaiting the end when all wrongs will be righted.

C. Just like the world is anticipating the end, so are Christians – those who “have the firstfruits of the Spirit” (23). We anticipate the final redemption of our bodies in the resurrection (24-25).

1. There is confidence in our hope (Heb. 6:11, 19; 1 Pet. 1:3-5, 13).

2. There are responsibilities with our hope (1 John 3:3).

III. Providence (8:28-30)

A. The aforementioned redemption of the body, which will happen at the general resurrection of the dead, is all according to God’s plan and providence. He is working all of these things out for our good (28).

B. Christians are the ones predestined, called, justified, and glorified (29-30) – all of which are in harmony with both God’s sovereignty and man’s free will (cf. 2 Thess. 2:14).

IV. God’s Love (8:31-39)

A. In summary, Paul rhetorically asks, “If God is for us, who can be against us?” (31). Since God refused to spare his own son from death “for us all,” why would he not give us all these other things (32)?

B. No one can sustain a guilty charge against God’s elect (Christians) because God is the one who justifies and Jesus is our intercessor (33-34). The only ones who could condemn us are the ones who have saved us!

C. Therefore, nothing can separate us from the love of God in Christ (35-39). Though many things can try (tribulation, distress, etc.), “in all these things we are more than conquerors” (37).

Conclusion: There may not be a more encouraging and faith-building chapter in the New Testament than Romans 8. It gives all children of God a long list of reasons to be confident in their salvation, be strong in the face of difficulties, and be enthusiastic in their praise of God.

Benefits of Daily Bible Reading

There are at least two things necessary for someone to begin an exercise program: (1) conviction regarding the advantages of the program; (2) the desire for those benefits. If either is missing, there will be no change in behavior. One may long to lose weight and increase heart health, but if he doesn’t believe the program will work, he won’t do it. Likewise, one may think that a program is effective, but if he doesn’t want to lose weight and be healthier, he won’t start the program.

As shepherds who watch the welfare of souls (Heb. 13:17), most elderships challenge the members in their charge to participate in a spiritual exercise program that includes daily Bible reading. With the hope of motivating us to engage in this helpful spiritual exercise, let us consider some of the benefits of it.

Daily Bible reading offers wisdom, direction, and guidance for life. Because “it is not in man who walks to direct his steps” (Jer. 10:23), we must “trust in the Lord” so that “he will direct [our] paths” (Prov. 3:5-6). For us to know where God wants us to go, we must listen to him as he speaks through the words of scripture.

“I have stored up your word in my heart, that I might not sin against you” (Psa. 119:11).

“Your testimonies are my delight; they are my counselors” (Psa. 119:24).

“Your commandment makes me wiser than my enemies, for it is ever with me. I have more understanding than all my teachers, for your testimonies are my meditation” (Psa. 119:98-99).

“Through your precepts I get understanding; therefore I hate every false way. Your word is a lamp to my feet and a light to my path” (Psa. 119:104-105).

“The unfolding of your words gives light; it imparts understanding to the simple” (Psa. 119:130).

As we walk each day down the pathways of life, there are always people telling us which path is the right one. How do we filter out dangerous, destructive, evil advice? How do we recognize who is directing us wisely and who foolishly? By sifting what we hear through the word of God. But each day that passes without our reading it, the less equipped we are to choose the right path.

Daily Bible reading reveals weaknesses and challenges us to work on our character. Regular self-examination is more than wise. It is vital (2 Cor. 13:5). Each time we open the word of God and think about what we are reading, we will discover something about ourselves. Often that discovery involves a weakness, sin, or area of needed improvement. Paul identified this helpful characteristic of the Bible when he wrote, “All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness” (2 Tim. 3:16). Is there anyone who could not benefit from this kind of character formation each day?

Daily Bible reading can enhance our prayers and praise. If you find yourself struggling to know what to say to God, reading and meditating on the Scriptures can improve the content of your prayers. Through regular communion with God in his word, we will find more and more reasons to offer thanksgiving and praise.

“I will praise you with an upright heart, when I learn your righteous rules” (Psa. 119:7).

“Seven times a day I praise you for your righteous rules” (Psa. 119:164).

“My lips will pour forth praise, for you teach me your statutes” (Psa. 119:171).

Daily Bible reading gives you material to think about when you aren’t reading. Our minds are never idle. They always focus on something. The things we think about originate from things we have previously perceived through our senses. The more we read the word of God, the more thought material we will have stored in our memories.

“At midnight I rise to praise you, because of your righteous rules” (Psa. 119:62).

“My eyes are awake before the watches of the night, that I may meditate on your promise” (Psa. 119:148).

Daily Bible reading can increase our comfort in times of difficulty. Earth is not heaven. Therefore, we will not escape hardships in this life. But the word of God offers a kind of comfort and peace in these trying times that nothing else can.

“For whatever was written in former days was written for our instruction, that through endurance and through the encouragement of the Scriptures we might have hope” (Rom. 15:4).

“This is my comfort in my affliction, that your promise gives me life” (Psa. 119:50).

“When I think of your rules from of old, I take comfort, O Lord” (Psa. 119:52).

“Great peace have those who love your law; nothing can make them stumble” (Psa. 119:165).

Daily Bible reading can fill us with hope for the future. The more aware we become of the moral and spiritual degradation of our culture, the more prone to discouragement we may become. But the more we read and meditate on the word of God, the more confidence we have in our future as his children. Reading the word of God each day can lift our spirits.

“And take not the word of truth utterly out of my mouth, for my hope is in your rules” (Psa. 119:43).

“Remember your word to your servant, in which you have made me hope” (Psa. 119:49).

These are not the only benefits to a program of daily Bible reading. But they should be enough to motivate us to invest time each day in communing with God and allowing him to offer us instruction, guidance, help, encouragement, wisdom, rebuke, comfort, and peace.