A Quick List: “Rest” in Hebrews 4

A “Quick List” is exactly what you might think: a simple list of facts taken from a passage of Scripture. These will not contain long explanations, only unadorned observations.

The word “rest” appears ten times in the NASB95 in the first eleven verses of Hebrews 4. Here is a quick list of what we learn about that rest.

  • It is God’s rest (4:1, 3, 5, 10). He began it after the creation week (4:3-4). It involved the cessation of his creative work (4:10).
  • It is for believers (4:3).
  • It is for God’s people (4:9).
  • It involves the cessation of our work (4:10).
  • It is not for the faithless (4:2) or disobedient (4:11).
  • It is not the land of Canaan (4:8).
  • It is a future blessing (4:1, 6, 9, 11).
  • It is possible to fall short of it (4:1, 11).

Hebrews 3 Study Sheet

The following is a simple study sheet that contains a brief outline of the chapter and a few questions that focus on the text. One of the first and most important parts of good Bible study is observation. What does the text say? Until we know what the text says, it is fruitless to try to discover what it means and how it applies. Most of the questions are designed to do little more than help the reader observe the text. There may be an occasional question that asks for deeper meaning or application.

OUTLINE

I. Jesus is Superior to Moses (3:1-6)

A. Both Moses and Jesus were faithful (3:1-2).

B. But Jesus is worthy of more honor (3:3-6).

1. Just as a builder has more honor than the house he builds (3:3-4)

2. Just as a son has more honor than a servant (3:5-6)

II. A History Lesson (3:7-11)

A. A quotation from Psalm 95:7-11

B. During the wilderness wanderings, the Hebrews developed hard hearts.

III. A Warning (3:12-19)

A. Be careful that you do not develop a hard heart like they did (3:12).

B. Instead, encourage each other and hold fast to Jesus (3:13-14).

C. To develop a hard heart could excite the anger of God and result in a forfeiture of future blessing (3:15-19).

QUESTIONS

1. How does the writer refer to the recipients in 3:1?

2. How does the writer refer to Jesus in 3:1?

3. What characteristic do Jesus and Moses share (3:2)?

4. How does the writer affirm the deity of Jesus in 3:3-4?

5. How do we maintain our place in God’s house according to 3:6? (Hint: note the “if” statement)

6. How does the writer affirm the inspiration of scripture in 3:7?

7. According to 3:12, is it possible to fall away from God?

8. What can consistent encourage prevent (3:13)?

9. A word is repeated in verses 7, 13, and 15 that emphasizes the urgency of listening to God, encouraging each other, and maintaining a soft heart. What word is it?

10. Why were the Hebrews not able to enter the Promised Land (3:19)?

APPLICATION

Most Christians recognize their need to grow (2 Pet. 3:18). Most Christians understand that it’s possible to drift away from the Lord (Heb. 2:1-2). But I wonder how many of us feel a strong sense of urgency to address our spiritual growth. In this chapter, the writer tries to impress on his readers how important it is to address their wavering faith “today” (3:7, 13, 15).

What can you do today to improve your spiritual health? Make a list. Prioritize it. Then invest the time and energy to deepen your relationship with Jesus.

Hebrews 2 Study Sheet

The following is a simple study sheet that contains a brief outline of the chapter and a few questions that focus on the text. One of the first and most important parts of good Bible study is observation. What does the text say? Until we know what the text says, it is fruitless to try to discover what it means and how it applies. Most of the questions are designed to do little more than help the reader observe the text. There may be an occasional question that asks for deeper meaning or application.

OUTLINE

I. A Warning (2:1-4)

A. Pay attention to the words that God has spoken through his Son (2:1).

B. There is no escaping punishment otherwise (2:2-4).

II. Man Lost His Dominion Over Death (2:5-8)

A. In the beginning, God subjected the entire earthly environment to men.

B. But now we do not see everything subject to man.

III. Jesus Came to Fix What Men Broke (2:9-18)

A. Jesus became man to “taste of death” for everyone (2:9-10).

B. Jesus is not ashamed of our fraternal relationship (2:11-13).

C. Jesus became man to destroy the power of Satan, conquer our sin, and help us in our temptations (2:14-18).

QUESTIONS

1. What is the significance of “therefore” or “for this reason” in 2:1?

2. We are to pay close attention to “what we have heard” from whom (2:1)?

3. What is “the word spoken through angels” (2:2)?

4. What makes Christianity “great” (2:3)?

5. What gives New Testament teaching its authority (2:3-4)?

6. Hebrews 2:6-8 quotes what Old Testament passage?

7. Who is the “him” of Hebrews 2:6-8?

8. Over what did man lose his dominion when he was expelled from Eden?

9. What did Jesus do “for everyone” (2:9)?

10. What was the ultimate goal of the suffering of Jesus (2:10)?

11. What two things did Jesus accomplish in his death (2:14-15)?

12. Why was it necessary for Jesus “to be made like his brethren in all things” (2:17)?

APPLICATION

The writer’s warning in 2:1-4 becomes increasingly important when we realize that we can drift from spiritual safety through simple neglect. We do not have to wake up one morning and consciously decide to turn from God in order to lose our salvation. We can lose it a little at a time until we’ve lost it altogether. Think about some spiritual activities that we can find it easy to neglect. How can this neglect be detrimental? What are some ways that we can purposely increase our involvement in these activities?

Carefully read Hebrews 2:9-18 and list every characteristic that the writer attributes to Jesus. How do those characteristics affect your devotion to him?

Hebrews 1 Study Sheet

The following is a simple study sheet that contains a brief outline of the chapter and a few questions that focus on the text. One of the first and most important parts of good Bible study is observation. What does the text say? Until we know what the text says, it is fruitless to try to discover what it means and how it applies. Most of the questions are designed to do little more than help the reader observe the text. There may be an occasional question that asks for deeper meaning or application.

OUTLINE

I. God Has Spoken Through His Son (1:1-3)

A. In the past, God spoke through the prophets (1)

B. In these last days, God has spoken through his Son (2-3)

C. The Son of God possesses all of the characteristics of his father.

D. The Son now sits at the right hand of the Father in heaven.

II. The Son of God is Superior to Angels (1:4-14)

A. No individual angel was ever singled out as “son” like Jesus was (4-5).

B. Angels worship the Son (6).

C. Angels are servants (7, 14); the Son rules an eternal kingdom (8-9, 13).

D. The Son created the earth and will one day destroy it (10-12).

QUESTIONS

  1. How does the writer describe the ways that God previously spoke through the prophets (1:1)?
  2. To what does the phrase “these last days” refer?
  3. There are seven characteristics of Jesus listed in 1:2-3. What are they?
  4. What does it mean to say that Jesus “upholds all things by the word of His power” (1:3)?
  5. What is the significance of being “at the right hand” of God (1:3)?
  6. In what way does the writer say that Jesus is better than the angels (1:4)?
  7. Why might it have been necessary for the writer to show that Jesus was superior to angels?
  8. There are seven different Old Testament quotations in 1:5-13. What are they?
  9. When God said to the Son, “This day have I begotten You,” to what day does He refer (1:5)?
  10. What is the significance of the term “firstborn” in 1:6?
  11. When the writer says, “Your throne, O God, is forever and ever” (1:8), of whom is he speaking?
  12. What do angels do (1:14)?

APPLICATION

Because Jesus: (1) is the one through whom God has spoken in these last days, (2) is the heir of God, (3) is the creator of the world, (4) is the radiance of God’s glory, (5) is the exact representation of God’s nature, (6) is the one who cleansed our sins, (7) is seated at God’s right hand, (8) is superior to angels, (9) is God’s Son, (10) is worshiped even by angels, (11) righteously rules an eternal kingdom, (12) will outlast the universe, (13) and sends out angels to do his bidding as they serve on behalf of Christians, then there is NO ONE who deserves our allegiance more than He.

If we were to turn away from Jesus, to whom better could we go? Peter was exactly right when he responded to Jesus’ question, “You do not want to go away also, do you?” by saying, “Lord, to whom shall we go? You have words of eternal life” (John 6:67-68).

Introduction to Hebrews

First century Christians faced challenges and persecution from many sources, including Jewish ones. These Jewish problems confronted Christians in two ways. One, some Jewish converts to Christianity tried to bind on Gentiles the practice of circumcision and other elements of the Law of Moses as a means of salvation. This is the background of the book of Galatians. Second, there were devout Jews, still loyal to the Law of Moses, who persecuted their Jewish friends and neighbors who had been converted to Christ. They did this in an effort to bring those Jews back into full allegiance to the Law of Moses. This is the setting for the book of Hebrews.

AUTHOR/WRITER

The ultimate source of Hebrews is the Holy Spirit of God (2 Tim. 3:16-17; 1 Cor. 2:10-13; Eph. 3:3-5). It is not the purpose of this treatise to detail the evidence that supports that conclusion. But the evidence exists that will lead the objective student to conclude that Hebrews belongs in the Scriptures.

As to the identity of the human writer, the simple and accurate answer is that we do not know. While many believe that the apostle Paul wrote Hebrews, and that conclusion is not without evidence, there is also substantial evidence against Pauline authorship. Some have suggested Luke, Apollos, Barnabas, and others. Had God intended for us to know the name of the writer, he would have made sure that we did. It is enough for us to know that the book is inspired.

DATE

The writer used a lot of ink to prove the point that the Law of Moses and the Levitical system of sacrifices had fulfilled their purposes and been replaced by the Law of Christ, with Jesus now serving as High Priest. One of the most visible signs of that change came in AD 70 when the Roman armies attacked the city of Jerusalem and destroyed the temple (Matt. 24:1-35). Had that event already taken place by the time Hebrews was written, there is little doubt that the writer would have included a discussion of it. In addition, the language of the letter, specifically in 8:4 and 10:11, leaves the impression that priests were still offering daily sacrifices in the temple. These two points are the strongest lines of evidence that Hebrews was written prior to AD 70.

But how long before AD 70 was it? All we have from within the letter are vague statements regarding how long the recipients had been Christians. In 5:12, the writer affirms that enough time had elapsed since their conversion that they should have been more mature than they actually were. In 10:32, he encourages them to look back to “the former days” soon after their conversion when they patiently endured persecution. That’s not much material, but when coupled with external evidence, most scholars place the date of writing in 63-64 AD.

RECIPIENTS

The title, “To the Hebrews,” is on many early manuscripts and how the earliest uninspired writers refer to the book. The way the writer refers to the tabernacle, Levitical priesthood, and Jewish history seems to assume that the readers would have been familiar with those things. The emphasis, especially in chapters 8-10, on the superiority of the New Testament over the Old leaves the impression that the writer is trying to convince his readers to accept that superiority. All of those characteristics, added to the many exhortations in Hebrews to remain faithful to Jesus and not go back to the Law of Moses, leads us to the conclusion that the original recipients of the book were Jewish.

Regarding their spiritual condition at the time, they were Christians (1:3; 2:3; 3:14; 10:32), but not new Christians (5:12; 10:32). They were immature (5:12-14; 6:1-3). They had faced persecution in the past (10:32-34) and were facing it at the time the letter was written (12:4). Due to this persecution, they were on the threshold of complete apostasy (3:12-13; 6:10, 12; 12:12-13).

PURPOSE

The writer calls the book a “word of exhortation” (13:22). As stated above, Jewish Christians were facing persecution from their non-Christian, Jewish friends and neighbors. These Jews did not accept that Jesus was Messiah and wanted to eradicate his influence among their kinsmen. The Jewish Christians were weakening under the weight of this persecution (3:13; 5:12; 6:10, 12; 10:32-34; 12:12-13, 16; 13:5). Hebrews contains repeated warnings against apostasy (4:1, 11, 14; 6:11-12; 10:22-25; 12:1, 28; 13:22), perhaps best summarized in 3:12, “Take care, brethren, that there not be in any one of you an evil, unbelieving heart that falls away from the living God.”

OUTLINE

I. The Superiority of the Person of Christ (1:1 – 7:28)

A. Jesus is superior to angels (1:1 – 2:18)

B. Jesus is superior to Moses (3:1 – 4:16)

C. Jesus is superior to the Levitical priests (5:1 – 7:28)

II. The Superiority of the Law of Christ (8:1 – 10:39)

A. A change in priesthood necessitates a change in law (8:1-13)

B. The inferior tabernacle and sacrifices (9:1 – 10:18)

C. The superior sacrifice of Jesus (10:19-39)

III. The Superiority of Christian Living (11:1 – 13:25)

A. Faith defined, described, and illustrated (11:1-40)

B. Christians must endure (12:1-17)

C. Choose: Mount Sinai or Mount Zion (12:18-29)

D. Miscellaneous exhortations and final greetings (13:1-25)